Coalition To Prevent Lead Poisoning

NATIONAL LEAD POISONING PREVENTION WEEK—OCTOBER 22–28, 2017

HOW DO CHILDREN GET LEAD POISONING?

Lead poisoning occurs when a person swallows or breathes in lead dust. Children—particularly those under the age of six—are most at risk. Even small amounts of dust, as little as a sugar packet's worth, can cause serious health problems, such as learning disabilities, attention deficit disorder, speech and language problems, and behavioral problems. That’s why it’s important to know the hazards that could put your child at risk.

PAINT IN HOMES BUILT BEFORE 1978

Older homes with peeling or deteriorated paint can produce lead dust that children ingest when they put their hands or toys into their mouths.

PREGNANCY AND LEAD EXPOSURE

Pregnant women who are exposed to lead may have an increased risk of premature birth, miscarriage, stillbirth, and low birth weight. Get a blood test for lead at your prenatal visit.

HOME RENOVATION PROJECTS

Lead dust hazards can be created during home renovation projects. To be safe, make sure you get your home tested before starting any renovation projects and hire only EPA Renovation, Repair & Painting (RRP) certified contractors—as they're required by the law to have their certification.

OTHER SOURCES

Lead can be found in soil, water, jewelry, pottery, candy, imported cosmetics, folk remedies, and hobby materials. Always check labels for lead hazards.

WHAT YOU CAN DO

The effects of lead poisoning are serious—and permanent. But there are steps you can take to reduce the risk and protect your child’s future. Know the symptoms of lead poisoning: headache, stomachache, irritability, fatigue, loss of appetite, and joint pain. Ask your child’s healthcare provider for a blood test to check for lead. The longer lead remains in the body of a young child, the higher the risk of permanent damage.

GET YOUR CHILD TESTED

The symptoms of lead poisoning aren’t always easy to see. That’s why New York State Law requires all children to be tested for exposure to lead at age one and again at two.

KNOW THEIR RESULTS

No level of lead has been found to be safe. If your child tests positive for lead, talk to your healthcare provider about what their blood lead test results mean.

REQUEST A FREE HOME INSPECTION

If you rent or own a home in the City of Rochester, call 585-428-6520 to request a free lead inspection. Renters, it’s your landlord’s responsibility to make sure your home is lead safe.

WASH HANDS FREQUENTLY

Wash your child’s hands with soap and water—not hand sanitizer—before eating and after playing to reduce the risk of swallowing lead dust.

EAT THE RIGHT FOODS

Don’t skip meals—an empty stomach increases the risk of absorbing lead dust. Foods high in iron and calcium can also help lower your child’s lead poisoning risk.

USE LEAD-SAFE CLEANING

Wet-mop with detergent and water at least three times a week. Take your shoes off when inside. Use a vacuum cleaner with a HEPA Filter. And wash your child’s toys daily.

RESOURCES
Healthy Home Environmental Health Hazards

Provides an overview on lead hazards and highlights the importance of getting children tested for exposure to lead.

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City of Rochester Lead Ordinance

Requires that all pre-1978 rental homes be assessed for lead hazards. FREE lead inspections are available by request for anyone residing in the City of Rochester. Property owners are required by federal law to address lead hazards using EPA Renovation, Repair and Painting (RRP) lead-safe certified firms.

(585) 428-6520

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Monroe County Department of Public Health Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program

Provides medical case management and educational outreach, conducts environmental investigations, responds to complaints of improper/unsafe lead hazard control activities, and issues Cease and Desist Orders to stop unsafe practices.

(585) 753-5087

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NeighborWorks® Rochester

Offers a loan program that provides resources to make repairs to owner-occupied houses, including lead paint remediation. Available to homeowners in Monroe County.

(585) 325-4170

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Western New York Lead Poisoning Resource Center

Evaluates and provides medical treatment for children with elevated blood lead levels. The center focuses on educating the public about lead poisoning prevention.

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Finger Lakes Environmental Health Center

Provides information concerning environmental exposures in children, pregnant or lactating women and women planning a pregnancy.

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