Coalition To Prevent Lead Poisoning

COALITION TO PREVENT LEAD POISONING ANNUAL MEETING JUNE 20, 2017, 1-2:30PM

TOGETHER, WE CAN MAKE LEAD HISTORY.

Even a small amount of lead can have a massive effect on a child’s future. The damage caused by lead poisoning can’t be treated. But it can be prevented. The Coalition to Prevent Lead Poisoning (CPLP) is committed to eliminating new cases of lead poisoning in Rochester through a combination of community advocacy and education on the importance of early detection and prevention. Join us to help ensure a better future for our children.

LEAD POISONING

Lead is a toxin that affects the brain, heart, bones and kidneys. Because of children’s growing brains and bodies, lead poisoning has a greater impact on children than adults. Even small amounts of lead in children’s bodies can cause permanent learning and behavioral problems, often with no physical symptoms. This includes a lower IQ, hyperactivity and delinquent behavior.

LEAD HAZARDS IN YOUR HOME

Lead poisoning occurs when harmful amounts of lead are swallowed or breathed in and it doesn’t take much–less than a sugar packet worth of lead is enough to poison a child. Homes built before 1978 are at risk for containing hazardous leaded dust and paint. Lead can also be found in soil, jewelry, toys, home remedies, ceramics, candy or water.

LEAD IN ROCHESTER

Lead paint in homes was banned in the United States in 1978. Paint in homes built before then may contain lead. Most of the homes in the City of Rochester were built before 1978, which puts them at risk for lead hazards. Since 2004, the number of children reported with lead poisoning has been reduced by 85%.

HISTORY

Most European countries and League of Nations ban the use of lead paint for interior use; United States declines to adopt ban.

1920s
1973

EPA issued regulations calling for a gradual reduction in the lead content of the total gasoline pool, which includes all grades of gasoline. The restrictions were scheduled to be implemented starting on January 1, 1975, and to extend over a five-year period.

Centers for Disease Control lowers the limit for a lead poisoned child to 30 µg/dL (micrograms per deciliter).

1975
2000

1,293 children age six and younger in Monroe County reported to have blood lead levels of 10 µg/dL and higher.

"Coalition to Prevent Lead Poisoning" founded in Rochester, NY.

2000
2005

Monroe County Department of Public Health lowers level for investigation to a blood lead level of 15 mg/dL(milligrams per deciliter) from NYS mandate of 20 mg/dL.

Implementation of City of Rochester Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention Ordinance

2006
2009

Monroe County Dept of Public Health lowers level for investigation to a blood lead level of 10 µg/dL from NYS mandate of 15 mg/dL.

Monroe County Department of Public Health lowers level of investigation to a blood lead level of 8 mg/dL from NYS mandate of 10 µg/dL (County will investigate by request if a child living within City limits has a blood test of 5 mg/dL and above).

Centers for Disease Control lowers the limit for a lead poisoned child to 5 µg/dL.

2012
2016

Since 2006, the City of Rochester has inspected 141,474 individual dwellings under the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention Ordinance—95% of these dwellings have passed the visual aspect of the inspection.

ELIMINATING LEAD POISONING IS EVERYONE'S RESPONSIBILITY.

Lead poisoning is untreatable, but almost entirely preventable. Learn more about how you can play a role in making your children and our community lead safe.

PARENTS

Have your child tested for exposure to lead. By NYS law, children must be tested at age 1 and again at 2.

See More Resources

HOMEOWNERS

Have your home professionally tested for lead if it was built before 1978.

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HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS

Healthcare professionals need to make sure children are tested for exposure to lead at age 1 and again at 2 in accordance with New York State Lead Laws.

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EDUCATORS

Teachers and educators often face the consequences of childhood lead poisoning in their classrooms. If you suspect lead poisoning, check your student's file to see whether there is any documentation of an elevated blood lead level.

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CONTRACTORS

Use Lead Safe Work Practices when doing any renovation or repair work that disturbs any painted surface.

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MUNICIPALITIES

Due to the age of housing stock in our region, lead safe work practices and observance of the EPA RRP rule must be observed–regardless of geography.

NEWS

06/05
2017
Blood tests significantly underestimated lead levels, FDA and CDC warn
Washington Post

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06/05
2017
Measuring the impact of lead exposure on learning and cognition
EducationDIVE

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06/05
2017
Baby teeth link autism and heavy metals
National Institutes of Health

Baby teeth from children with autism contain more toxic lead and less of the essential nutrients zinc and manganese, compared to teeth from children without autism, according to an innovative study funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes of Health.

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04/21
2017
Hundreds more lead hotspots are identified as Trump prepares to gut programs
Reuters

An ongoing Reuters investigation has found another 449 areas around the U.S. with lead exposure rates double those found in Flint. But cities across the country say pending federal budget cuts could imperil efforts to eradicate the toxic metal.

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04/19
2017
A Focus on Health to Resolve Urban Ills
The New York Times

On a crisp morning in the struggling Bay Area city of Richmond, Calif., Doria Robinson prepares a community vegetable garden for an onslaught of teenagers who will arrive that afternoon. Beyond the farm, a Chevron refinery pumps plumes of smoke into the atmosphere. The farm won’t remove the pollution, but Robinson believes it can make the city’s residents healthier in other ways, specifically by showing them that “their actions have an impact.”

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06/28
2016
Number of Children Reported Lead Poisoned Grows from Previous Year
Coalition to Prevent Lead Posoning

Number of children reported lead poisoned grows from previous year; continuation of local prevention effort needed to keep children safe.

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